Blog

  • by Architecture for Humanity
  • Oct 25, 2012
  • comments

At long last.... We are eager to share with you that the classroom building of phase 1 of Ecole Baptiste Bon Berger, Pele, Haiti is substantially complete. The school site is located in Simon Pele, on the outskirts Citi Soleil in Haiti, which has bad reputation for violence and high concentration of underpriviledged children. This project location was a challlenge however, we've defeated the odds. (see below)

  • by Architecture for Humanity
  • Oct 24, 2012
  • comments

Headquarters has recently devised and established a new tracking tool for the six Football for Hope centres now in construction in Botswana, Tanzania, Cameroon, and South Africa (2), and Mozambique. The device is analog, occupying a field with metered imaging–we're stoked to use tech lingo (or our closest approximation) from the heart of San Francisco. Some HQ members are calling the device a "race track," but a more precise name would be "progress wall." For Humanity.

  • by Architecture for Humanity
  • Oct 19, 2012
  • comments

Yesterday, promptly at 10:18 our office manager drilled us on emergency procedure for earthquakes, as part of nationwide Great Shakeout. The office was prepared–in part due to Jason's reminder orientation of emergency kits, routes and off-site meeting area. The procedure's changed since the last time we ran it six months ago–in part because our previous meet-up parking lot is now a condo construction site. Hey, in SOMA, you have to be prepared for everything.

Our Shakeout drill was planned by our Resiliency and Recovery Studio. We're thrilled that this drill dovetails so easily with the grant work being done via ArchitectsRebuild.org, and hope to get similar updates soon from the Grantees. Photos after the break.

Land title and land tenure. Believe it or not, it’s this battle that’s dictating the pace of reconstruction in Haiti–and the issue is hairy. I mean, technical. Architecture for Humanity Design Fellow Frederique “Rickie” Siegel fell into a working group last year bent on addressing the bottleneck on permanent development throughout the country following (but not due to) the 2010 earthquake. Headquarters had an extended conversation with Rickie that, however tempted we are to edit down for running “a bit long,” remains unabridged–with hopes it provides a comprehensive explanation of what it’s going to take to turn the issues of “who owns what where” in Haiti into an accessible system from which permanent construction on “untenable” property can be legally defended. If you can get through it, you'll be eternally rewarded.

Pages