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  • by Architecture for Humanity
  • Oct 01, 2012
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Some of the leading design professionals gathered at this year's annual meeting of the Clinton Global Initiative, which focused on the theme "Designing for Impact." Issues ranged from design as a tool for ideation to design as a tool for addressing systemic issues such as climate change. At a session focused on "Resilient Cities" a group focused on some of the challenges faced by cities increasingly vulnerable to disaster, both man-made and natural. Small group charrettes developed action plans for six major cities around the world in an effort to explore ideas and approaches to making cities more prepared and able to cope with change.

  • by Architecture for Humanity
  • Sep 28, 2012
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In partnership with The Center for Green Schools at the United States Green Building Council, Architecture for Humanity invites you to join thousands of people around the world who will take action in their communities in support of hea

  • by Architecture for Humanity
  • Sep 27, 2012
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Originally reported on Students Rebuild Japan blog in August

Japan Program Coordinator Hiromi Tabei has just returned to San Francisco from a week-long strategy session in Sendai. While she never left Tohoku’s largest city during this trip, conversations with the Japan team and explorations around town confirmed some surprising developments along the coast. Some seem far-fetched, but to what extend do we build for the safety of our neighbors?

  • by Architecture for Humanity
  • Sep 26, 2012
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October 2012 Tohoku Newsletter Banner

  • by Architecture for Humanity
  • Sep 24, 2012
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Two asks, one why, and endless potential.

Designed to Move – a Physical Activity Action Agenda, co-authored by the American College of Sports Medicine, Nike Inc, and the International Council of Sports Science and Physical Education lays a new framework for action (inspired by alarming rates of in-action).

The report highlights the rising and global spread of inactivity in daily human life and calls for immediate and dramatic shifts in lifestyle, education, planning, policy, and (of course) the built environment.

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