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  • by Architecture for Humanity
  • Aug 22, 2012
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Call them a "Haitian artist collective." Twenty creatives have been invited through an RFP to design, build and install Civic Art in Schools through microgrants sponsored by the Digicel Foundation and Deutsche Bank.

The Grant program, launched last Summer, engaged local Haitian artists with various schools around the country. A year later, nine schools have become the recipients of art pieces developed by artists in collaboration with the students of the school. They're not all installed yet, but we couldn't contain ourselves to show off the work accomplished to date. The past few weeks have been a flurry of putting wrapped sculptures in truck beds and driving them from artist studios to school courtyards in Port-au-Prince, Léogane, Ceverine, Croix des Bouquets and elsewhere.

  • by Architecture for Humanity
  • Aug 17, 2012
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Tohoku sees frigid winters that can stop construction, well, cold. It's a reminder to us to adopt the familiar mission to "take full advantage of Summer," in a construction sense. (We'll talk more about winter projects in just a bit.)

The end of July marks the half-way point for the Tohoku construction season, and we figured we could take stock of how our collaborative rebuilding projects are helping the tsunami-stricken region recover. The four featured cast a wide net of methods, materials and the unique conditions demanding their careful consideration.

  • by Architecture for Humanity
  • Aug 17, 2012
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Starting next week Architecture for Humanity will be showcased at three venues in Venice. The most important of these is the unveiling of the winners of the 2011 Open Architecture Challenge: Unrestricted Access.

  • by Architecture for Humanity
  • Aug 13, 2012
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Illac Diaz from My Shelter Foundation in the Philippines, sends us news on the impacts of flooding in the Philippines. We had worked with Illac previously on the Bottle School project after Typhoon Ketsana.

  • by Architecture for Humanity
  • Aug 10, 2012
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Architecture for Humanity
press@architectureforhumanity.org

In response to disastrous flooding this week in Manila, the Philippines, Architecture for Humanity is launching a long-term disaster response program to help rebuild and mitigate against similar future disasters in the region.

Bilang tugon sa mapinsalang pagbabaha sa Maynila, at mga karatig-pook sa Pilipinas – inilunsad ng Architecture for Humanity ang isang pang-matagalang programa na makakatulong sa muling pagbangon, at makakatulong sa pagharap sa mga kalamidad tulad ng pagbahang naganap.

On August 6, the Tropical Storm Haikui brought two days of heavy rains that caused massive flooding and landslides throughout the capital city of Manila in the Philippines. Over 800,000 people were evacuated from their homes and 250,000 people have moved into emergency shelters. It is estimated that 2 million people live in informal settlements in high-risk areas along riverbeds that are prone to flooding.

Noong ika-6 ng Agosto, dalawang araw ng matinding pag-ulan ang dala ng Tropical Storm Haikui. Nagdulot ito ng pagbaha at mga “landslide” sa Maynila. Higit sa 800,000 tao ang lumikas sa kanilang mga tahanan, at may 250,000 tao ang inilipat na sa mga emerhensiyang kanlungan. Tinatantiya na may 2 milyon katao ang nakatira sa mga high-risk o mapanganib na mga lugar, malapit sa mga “riverbeds” na madalas bahain.

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