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  • by Architecture for Humanity
  • Nov 12, 2012
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Follow Design Like You Give a Damn: LIVE! and the Chapter Forum via webcast here: http://new.livestream.com/accounts/1905633/events/1671821"

  • by Architecture for Humanity
  • Nov 11, 2012
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Last week the Disaster Team and New York City Chapter toured nearly 140 miles of the New Jersey and New York coastlines to get a firsthand sense of the damage wrought late last month by Hurricane Sandy, and assessing the highest priorities in long-term reconstruction.

The overall impression: recovery will be complex. Damage along the coast is pocketed, with separate conditions from neighborhood to neighborhood, or even house to house. This condition sets the Eastern Seaboard apart from the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, which was vast and total.

Working class communities were the hardest hit, and will have the most trouble recovering. The Wall Street Journal reports that, with a couple exceptions, at least half of damaged residences in most towns are uninsured against floods, and only 1% of damaged homes in New York are insured against flood damage.

This update highlights four different circumstances of damage that last week's tour helped uncover.

  • by Architecture for Humanity
  • Nov 11, 2012
  • comments

As part of our long term response to Hurricane Sandy we are helping families who lost homes both by storm and fire. Help us rebuild one block and repair homes of first responders affected by Hurricane Sandy.

Our friends at Rai Studio and Tehran just sent us their newest projects for Afghan refugees and communities affected by a massive earthquake last August.

Pouya Khazaeli, principal of Rai Studio and architecture professor at Azad University, Tehran and Ghazvin, notes: "Social sustainability in design is our main focus area here. It means to study how these refugees live, communicate, the meaning of privacy in their live, which materials they prefer and use for construction, which kind of construction techniques they use themselves, how much they spend normally to construct their own shelters...."

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